Saturday, February 28, 2015

What have they learnt? (Work in Progress)

This is an ongoing post in which I want to capture some of my reflections on progress in my classroom and its students as I reach the end of my fellowship.

1) My students have deeper self-awareness about their values.
When I started, my students did not know the meaning of 'strength' and 'weakness'. Yesterday, when I was having a sharing circle, all the students who have been with me for the whole last year were able to identify their strengths and areas of development. Not just that, they were able to choose deeper values like 'empathy', 'compassion', 'grit' as some of their answers. They still have a long way to go till the actively work on their area of development - but at least the acceptance is a good start. 

2) Some of my students have become intelligent conversationalists.
Whenever I used to have a guest in class, students would ask questions which were highly factual with almost no follow through. Now, they engage in meaningful conversations and questioning, with many probing the 'why' of 'what' people say. Some of the common questions now-a-days are "What are your strengths?", "What are your areas of development?", "What do you like about our class and what do you think we should improve on?", "Why did you choose your current career?", "What is your vision?", etc!! While not all the children have reached such a level of conversation, but the high expectations have paid off in the long run.

3) Many students have developed basic English speaking skills for conversations.
I recently attended a scholarship ceremony with some of the best students from TFI classrooms. My dictate to my students was to not be seen with another person wearing the same uniform and getting to know other students around them. Without much involvement, I was supremely proud to see them stand on their own and confidently approach both adults and other children to get to know them.

4) My students are solving problems more peacefully.
When I started, I used to struggle getting a lesson through because of the numerous complaints that I used to receive. While the cribbing hasn't ceased in its entirety, students have developed the maturity to not let it interfere with the lesson. Most of the leaders have developed their own peaceful problem solving mechanisms that keep the classroom calmer. 

5) The female students are aware of the shared inequity that their gender faces.
My girls have developed the courage to think about and question unfair practices against the female gender in the community,  though not many are successful in overcoming them yet.  Not just that, they have begun to process religious inputs with a scientific mind - questioning the why of many things. As a teacher, I believe I have successfully planted the seeds. If not them, their children will reap the fruits of a thinking rooted in fairness of opportunity and choice. 

6) My students are adaptable to structural changes.
When handled consistently and messaged positively, my students have developed good adaptability in dealing with classroom structures. Despite all the unexpected changes in student configuration and teachers, things have remained largely under control in the classroom. 

7) My student leaders are actively taking charge.
Some student leaders have developed strong leadership and problem solving skills, handling team relations and driving classroom culture effectively.

8) Students are data-focused.
My kids love numbers that tell them how they are doing. They almost demand an analysis after every test - some for the sake of knowing how they are growing, while others for the sake of knowing their standing among others. No wonder I had a chilled out time teaching bar graphs and data!!

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